<FONT face="Default Sans Serif,Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif" size=2><DIV>The link below doesn't provide a list of all deleaded apartments, but it does allow you to search and locate the inspection history for a specific address (including apartments):</DIV><DIV>&nbsp;</DIV><DIV><A href="http://www.leadsafehomes.info/MA_Registry/mainpage.jsp" target=blank>http://www.leadsafehomes.info/MA_Registry/mainpage.jsp</A></DIV><DIV>&nbsp;</DIV><DIV>Note: if you read the notes on the search results, it adds a caveat that local health departments may have more recent information than provided in this registry, so if you thought your home/apt had been inspected but there is no record, you might call the number rather than freak out.&nbsp; But if you find your place has been inspected and no violations found, apparently one clean result is good forever (though I'm a little unclear about that, between what it says on the website and what the lead inspector who came to my apt told me - see below).</DIV><DIV>&nbsp;</DIV><DIV>Funny story: when I was about 7 mos pregnant we broke the news to our landlord, who had told us when we moved in that they didn't know the lead status of the building.&nbsp;But given the age of the building he was pretty worried that it had lead paint. He came with the lead inspector and was pretty much shaking in his boots, and telling us about other lead-free buildings that they managed that would have a nice apt for us.&nbsp; About halfway through the inspection, they still had not found any lead and the landlord made a comment that he was starting to get his hopes up.&nbsp; I commented, "Well, when they inspected in the early 90s they didn't find anything, so maybe it will be fine this time too!"&nbsp; The inspector and landlord both said "What??? How do you know that?"&nbsp; And I pulled up the lead inspection report online, from the last inspection in 1994, in which no violations were found.&nbsp; The lead inspector said that a good inspection is good forever, so they stopped the inspection right there (I assumed that even though it had been inspected in 1994, that it must need to be inspected again).&nbsp; The inspector apologized for not checking the registry before coming out to the apt.&nbsp; The landlord (who bought the building after 1994) discovered that not only was my apt lead-free, but so were the other ~50 units in the building.&nbsp; So I made his day instead of ruining it.&nbsp; It was pretty funny.</DIV><DIV>&nbsp;</DIV><DIV>- Judy<BR></DIV><FONT color=#990099>-----parentsgroup-list-bounces@lists.hcs.harvard.edu wrote: -----<BR><BR></FONT><BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">To: parentsgroup-list@lists.hcs.harvard.edu<BR>From: susan_mcdonald@ksg07.harvard.edu<BR>Sent by: parentsgroup-list-bounces@lists.hcs.harvard.edu<BR>Date: 11/29/2007 09:08AM<BR>Subject: [Parentsgroup-list] dealing with lead<BR><BR><DIV>Hi all, </DIV><DIV>In response to Emily's comments, I worked previously in the field of toxics reduction. When I moved into my Cambridge apartment with my toddler, I checked with one of the residential toxic specialists at my old agency. She advised me, based on literature published in Washington State, that a frequently/thoroughly cleaned home with little dust (and little disruption of existing paint) was a reasonable choice. Obviously, a professionally deleaded apartment would be preferable, but it's not clear to me that an amateur job would be better and might be worse.&nbsp; It may be wasteful, but I clean the windows and floors with baby wipes rather than rags so I can throw them away. Vacuuming frequently helps,&nbsp;but I&nbsp;don't empty the vacuum cleaner when he is near as that is a concentrated dose of dust. I do get my son tested every year and there has not been a problem so far. </DIV><DIV>&nbsp; </DIV><DIV>I don't want to minimize the dangers of lead either. What concerns me most here is that the burden of&nbsp;implementing and enforcing Massachusetts lead regulations seems to fall on&nbsp;individual renters/parents. When you move to Boston, is there a registry somewhere of affordable deleaded apartments? And, how do we maintain standards for what is considered adequate deleading? The regulation makes it seem like the state takes lead seriously, but that does not really seem to be the case. </DIV><DIV>Susan </DIV><FONT face="Default Monospace,Courier New,Courier,monospace" size=2>_______________________________________________<BR>Parentsgroup-list mailing list<BR>Parentsgroup-list@lists.hcs.harvard.edu<BR><A href="http://lists.hcs.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/parentsgroup-list" target=blank>http://lists.hcs.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/parentsgroup-list</A><BR></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE><BR></FONT>